What were my memorable books of 2016?

I don't read nearly as much these days. Or maybe not as much as I'd prefer in some idealistic (unreal) world where I get to spend a few hours a day soaking up good literature.

Mostly, I'm reading Goodnight, Gorilla, There's a Rumble in the Jungle or Fancy Nancy. (Let's be honest. I actually like children's literature.) And at bedtime, Anna has fallen in love with (routine?) my narration of homegrown stories. (In case you're wondering, I'm a terrible storyteller. I wish I were that dad whose stories inspire her to one day look back and marvel at the whimsical, imaginative stories I cooked up at bedtime, but alas, probably not. I'm learning slowly, though, at least about what kind of story she will likely enjoy.)

But in the margins of here and there, I have found time for a sampling of books in 2016. Here are some memorable ones:

More of Less, Joshua Becker

A helpful guide on minimizing excess (possessions) so you can focus on what's most important: relationships.

Chasing Francis, Ian Morgan Cron

Thoroughly enjoyed (and was deeply challenged by) this fresh take on St. Francis' life through the lens of a modern day evangelical pastor pilgrim from Connecticut.

You Are What You Love, James K.A. Smith

In between a front and back cover, I found a book which scratched an itch for reflection on cultural exegesis, ecclesiology, discipleship, eschatology and spiritual formation. I like this guy.

Proverbs: Wisdom that Works, Raymond C. Ortlund, Jr.

Great guide through the main themes of the practical side of God's wisdom for living. Highly recommend this for any interested reader of Proverbs.

Reversed Thunder: The Revelation of John and the Praying Imagination, Eugene Peterson

Not a commentary, but rather a poetic reflection upon the potent apocalyptic epistle which has much to say for today's church. Should we expect anything less from Peterson. His chapter on the Word/Logos was particularly memorable.

You Can Pray, Tim Chester

There are so many books on prayer, yet this one encouraged me toward prayer  maybe more than any I've read. He presents a good Trinitarian, gospel-centered framework for nudging us into Abba's presence.

The Selfish Giant, Oscar Wilde

It was an innocuous selection from the library at the time, but this version of an old tale grabbed my heart one unsuspecting morning while reading to Anna on the couch. I adore how the giant's cold, miserly heart is softened and ultimately set free by the children and one particularly sacrificial child.

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