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Showing posts from November, 2007

Teaching to Change Lives

I just finished up Teaching to Change Lives, an excellent book by Howard Hendricks. His humor, wit and stories from years of experience make this a challenging and practical read. I highly recommend it for anyone involved in teaching, mentoring or leading, or for anyone who just wants to be challenged in the ways that you approach learning. The flesh of his book is laid upon a skeleton of seven propositions:
“The effective teacher always teaches from the overflow of a full life”“The way people learn determines how you teach.”“Maximum learning is always the result of maximum involvement.”“To truly impart information requires the building of bridges.”“Teaching that impacts is not head to head, but heart to heart.”“Teaching is most effective when the learner is properly motivated.”“The teaching-learning process will be most effective when both teacher and learner are adequately prepared.”

Mover

Two weeks ago, I had my first chance to teach at our weekly worship gathering (Saturday Night Grace). I gave the final talk in a series "Spiritual Climate in Crisis." You can listen to it online. I'm new at this, so it's not too long-winded :) Unfortunately, you'll miss out on some fun images I shared, such like these:

I read a couple books as I researched and thought about the topic of the Sabbath. I recommend the Sabbath by Abraham Heschel, for some Jewish, historical background and Keeping the Sabbath Wholly by Marva Dawn, for a contemporary, Christian perspective. Dawn shares some thoughts for intertwining some of the beautiful Jewish practices into our remembrance of the Sabbath. Also, check out JR's post on the Sabbath.

I'm a big fan of benedictions, so I wrote one out for this teaching. I pasted it in below. All in all, I really enjoyed this first experience of teaching/preaching/talking/presenting/dialogue-ing (however you choose to call it). God ga…

Remembering old friends

After four years of lost contact, I had brief, but refreshing, conversation with an old friend just before Thanksgiving. And so, I want to give thanks for friends that God has placed in my life during seasons of change.

Four years ago, I was in South Africa for six months and God gave me a few close friends during my still-hard-to-believe-it-was-real African experience. About every six months, I reconnect with one of those friends, Sam Adams (yup). We update eachother on our lives and encourage eachother in our respective ministries. Originally from Zimbabwe, where his parents worked with an NGO, Sam moved to Cape Town and was attending the University of Cape Town and helping to lead the college ministry at Jubilee, the church that I attended while in Cape Town. I remember lots of stimulating conversations about poverty, the Church and the work of God's Spirit in our world.

The previously mentioned friend, whom I reconnected with online the other day, was also from Zim. Tami Mugadza…

Must Everything Change?

I often enjoy reading books and listening to teachers that challenge my paradigm and presuppositions. So, currently, I'm reading Brian McClaren's latest controversial book, Everything Must Change. And his book is certainly not disappointing me in my desire to be challenged, although much of his discussion pertains to topics that often plague my conscience.

I haven't done a book review in a while...actually, I've probably never blogged a true book review, but I have a few spare minutes to start one, so here ya go.

McClaren opens with two questions that have bothered him for much of his Christian life, questions which were the impetus behind this latest book: What are the biggest problems in the world? What does Jesus have to say about these global problems?

He then reveals the inspiration for the book's controversial title. He and his daughter were at a conference in Berundi, along with fifty Christian leaders from Sub-Saharan Africa. There, they discussed what the Gos…