Beyond our normal margins

Here are two interesting articles that I've read recently.

The first is by Scott McKnight
Getting the Gospel Right

The second is an interview with Shane Claiborne
Dish Water, Smart Bombs, and Life Together

I want to re-read both of these. There's some good stuff here. Some stuff I'm not sure I agree with and some stuff that I know we've been missing for a while. What do you think?

Colorado 2.0

I'm well into my third week here at 8,010 feet in beautiful Estes Park, CO. I often find it hard to grasp that this is part of my full-time job. Not because I don't work, but because it is taking a great paradigm shift in my mind to see that what I get to do is "work." So often, I worship at the altar of efficiency and productivity, but you can't use those metrics when you are in a relational-oriented career!

As this blog post title suggests, this is my second version of being in Colorado for GCM's leadership training program. Version 2.0 has an entirely different look, because I am not a student anymore. When I reflect on what I learned two years ago, I remember that I learned a great deal about distractions. And goal setting. Relationship building. Prayer. Scripture meditation. Leading. And sharing my faith in Christ. But that was just the beginning. What does v2.0 have in store?

Already, I am discovering that God would be pleased if I learn more about servanthood. How often do I go out of my way to serve someone else? How often do I inconvenience myself for the benefit of a friend? Here's another one: muliplication. That's something I haven't thought about since math class, but more than once, we've been hit with 2 Timothy 2:2 out here at LT. The Church won't grow without it, but we don't talk about it enough. Paul wished to entrust to Timothy something that he would in turn entrust to reliable men who would turn around and teach others. That's four generations of multiplication right there.

Colorado 2.0 seems to be a sequel to 1.0 in a lot of ways. I was stretched immensely in being transparent with others about the hope that I have in Christ, but I am still so weak in this area. Does my passion overflow to others? Do they even know I give a rip about Jesus Christ?

So, imagine that you are sitting in a coffee shop. You've got your favorite magazine open, with little coffee stains smattered across the pages. A stranger sits down next to you. Or, maybe it's an old friend from high school. You start chatting and before you know it, he or she throws out a question that you don't hear too often (or ever for that matter): "What do you think of Jesus?" How would you respond? Whether you call yourself a follower of Christ or not, I'm interested to hear your answers.